Tag Archives: Mindfulness

Nonduality is the philosophical, spiritual, and scientific understanding of non-separation and fundamental intrinsic oneness. The Science of Nonduality Conference will be held at the Embassy Suites Hotel in San Rafael, California from October 20 to October 24, bridging ancient wisdom with findings of modern science.

To see a conference schedule and register for Science and Nonduality, please visit http://www.scienceandnonduality.com/

Shauna Shapiro (Professor of Counseling Psychology, Santa Clara University. Co-author, The Art & Science of Mindfulness, 2009. Previously Adjunct Professor, Andrew Weil’s Integrated Medicine Program, University of Arizona) talks about the Art and Science of Mindfulness, and how to integrate mindfulness and meditation into psychotherapy and the helping professions.

John Briere (Professor of Psychiatry & Psychology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California) discusses the development of mindful attention & awareness in work with those in psychological pain, regardless of how “good” or “lovable” the client may appear to be.

Sylvia Boorstein (co-founder, teacher, Spirit Rock Meditation Center. Senior Teacher, Insight Meditation Society in Barre, MA. Etc.) describes wisdom as an antidote to mental suffering. Loving kindness and compassion as guarantors of an effective therapeutic presence.

More videos and information about Mindfulness conferences are available on http://facesconferences.com/

Jack Kornfield talks about mindfulness. Jack Kornfield video from the Mindfulness conference.

More videos and information about Mindfulness conferences are available on http://facesconferences.com/

Sharon Salzberg gives an inspiring lecture about our right to live happily, and what happens when our actions are not based on proper understanding of happiness.

Sharon Salzberg teaches vipassanā (insight), mettā (loving-kindness) and other meditation methods having their origins in the Theravada Buddhist tradition. Her approaches also touch on the Brahmavihara meditations. Together with Jack Kornfield and Joseph Goldstein, she founded the Insight Meditation Society in 1974. She also co-founded (with Goldstein) the Barre Center for Buddhist Studies in 1989. In 1998 they co-founded The Forest Refuge as a long-term meditation retreat center.

Mindfulness of Breathing is a simple but very effective meditation to calm the mind.

Sit comfortably, so that your body is relaxed, but your mind alert.

First, become aware of the environment and the people around you. Become aware of any sounds entering the room. Just let the sounds be there, whether they’re pleasant or unpleasant to the ear.

Second, become aware of your body. Feel the weight of your body on the cushion or on the chair. Let your body relax.

Third, become aware of any feelings or sensations there are in your body. Notice whether they’re pleasant, unpleasant or neutral. This is how you are in your body.

Fourth, become aware of the thoughts in your mind. Don’t get caught up in your thoughts. Just observe them as they arise and pass away. Observe any emotional tone to the thoughts. Can you feel any particular mood or attitude? This how you are in your mind.

Keeping a background awareness of environment, body and mind, now focus your attention on the breath. Become aware of the rise and fall of your chest with each in- and out-breath. Let your breathing be natural. Don’t control your breathing. Just let it flow. Follow the breath as it comes in and as it goes out. Now you are ready for the first of the four stages of the Mindfulness of Breathing.

Mindfulness of Breathing Meditation – First Stage
Keeping your attention on the breath, after each out-breath silently count from one to ten.

At the end of the first out-breath silently count “one”.

At the end of the second out-breath count “two”.

At the end of the third out-breath count “three”, and carry on counting at the end of each out-breath until you reach “ten”.

After you reach “ten”, start counting again at “one”.

If your mind wanders and you lose the count, gently bring your attention back to the breath, and start the count again at “one”.

Mindfulness of Breathing Meditation – Second Stage
Keeping your attention on the breath, instead of counting from “one” to “ten” at the end of each out-breath, in the second stage place the silent count just before each in-breath.

Just before the first in-breath silently count “one”.

Just before the second in-breath, count “two”, and so on, up to “ten”. When you reach “ten”, start counting again at “one” just before the in-breath.

If your mind wanders, and you lose the count, gently bring your attention back to the breath, and start the count again at “one”.

Mindfulness of Breathing Meditation – Third Stage
Keeping your attention on the breath, in the third stage, simply stop the counting, and follow the flow of the breath as it comes in and goes out of the body.

Whenever your mind wanders, gently bring your attention back to the breath.

Mindfulness of Breathing Meditation – Fourth Stage
In the fourth stage place your attention on the point where you first feel the breath as it enters the body. This could be inside the nostrils, or on the tip of your nose, or on the lips, or wherever you first feel the breath.

Concentrate on following the sensation of the breath as it flows in and goes out at the point where you first feel the breath as it enters the body.

Don’t worry if your mind keeps drifting away from the breath. This happens to all of us. Just gently bring your attention back to the breath and to the point where you first feel the breath as it enters the body.

Length of Meditation
To begin with, allow yourself a few minutes to become aware of your environment, body, feelings, and thoughts. Then turn your attention to the breath.

Spend about four or five minutes on each stage of the meditation.

When you finish the fourth stage, give yourself a few minutes to sit quietly.

To get the most benefit from the course try to meditate every day.

Try to establish a regular time of day when you will find a quiet place and meditate.