Tag Archives: Mindfulness and Psychotherapy: Deepening our Capacity to Notice and Manage Counter-transference

UCLA hosts a workshop titled “Mindfulness and Psychotherapy: Deepening our Capacity to Notice and Manage Counter-transference”.

Research on psychotherapy has documented a robust effect of the therapist’s personal qualities on treatment outcomes. One skill that impacts the therapeutic relationship and treatment outcomes is the effective management of counter-transference. Originally characterized as an intrusion into the process of healing, counter-transference is now appreciated as a source of important clinical information. However, the effective use of our counter-transference requires that we develop a deep sensitivity to our own emotional processes.

Mindfulness could be described as affording ourselves the same compassionate, diligent attentiveness we provide for our clients. The practice of mindfulness is a powerful tool that can be used to explore our emotional world in a new way. During our time together, we’ll work to listen deeply to surface and subtle aspects of our emotional reactivity. As our attention stabilizes and the mind becomes more still, we can investigate the forces that inform our therapeutic actions. This allows us to better distinguish non-conscious reactivity from mindful response and enhances our clinical effectiveness.

The morning will include presentations of the applications of mindfulness for mental health professionals, meditation instructions and practice, interactive exercises and time for discussion.

About the Instructor:
Matthew Brensilver, PhD, holds a master’s degree in clinical social work and has done psychotherapy with adolescents, adults and groups. He received a PhD from USC, where his research examined competing explanations of psychiatric comorbidity. Matthew is currently a postdoctoral fellow at UCLA’s School of Medicine, where he works with a group doing addiction research. Over a period of years, he was trained to teach mindfulness and leads groups at USC and within the community. Matthew completed “A Year to Live” practice – based on the book by Stephen Levine – and spent years sitting with hospice patients and their families.

Date: Saturday, Nov 6
Time: 9AM to 1PM
Venue: Marisa Leif (#3200), 300 Medical Plaza, UCLA
Cost: $50
Discounts: $35 UCLA Staff & UCLA 50Plus Program; $30 student & seniors; $40 KCRW subscriber
CEU (BBS Pending): $25 additional

More information available on http://marc.ucla.edu/body.cfm?id=28#MPsychotherapy