Tag Archives: American Group Psychotherapy Association

AGPA Teleconference Series – Principles of Group Psychotherapy Course will be offered by the American Group Psychotherapy Association

Dates: Sundays, January 8, January 22, February 5, and February 19, 2012

Time: 8:00-9:30 PM (Eastern); 7:00-8:30 PM (Central); 6:00-7:30 PM (Mountain); 5:00- 6:30 PM (Pacific)

Director: Diane Montgomery-Logan, MA, CGP, Private Practice, Winooski, Vermont

AGPA’s Distance Learning program is offering for the first time the Principles of Group Psychotherapy Course curriculum. The Principles course has been segregated into two parts. Part 1, the didactic portion, will be offered through four 90-minute teleconferences by experienced AGPA faculty. This course is consistent with the Principles course that has been taught at the AGPA Annual Meeting for many years. Participants must attend all four teleconferences. If you have a special circumstance and cannot attend one of the teleconferences, please contact the AGPA office. The four parts of Part 1 are a pre-requisite for Part 2, the experiential portion, which will be offered at the 2012 AGPA Annual Meeting as a one-day course. The completion of both parts fulfills the 12-hour group psychotherapy theory and practice course requirement for group psychotherapy theory and practice for certification as a Certified Group Psychotherapist (CGP) with the National Registry of Group Psychotherapists. This is an excellent opportunity for group therapists to complete Part 1 and fulfill this CGP requirement at home, leaving more time to attend other events at the Annual Meeting. The Principles of Group Psychotherapy (2006 version) curriculum manual is required. The manual is available for a discounted price for registrants.

Week 1–Sunday, January 8, Travis Courville, LCSW, CGP, FAGPA, Private Practice, Missouri City, Texas and Course Director, Diane Montgomery-Logan, MA, CGP, Private Practice, Winooski, Vermont

In this kickoff teleconference, we will discuss a brief history of group theory and therapy, definitions of group and psychotherapy group, group as a system, selection and preparation of group members, types of groups, and therapeutic factors of group treatment.

Learning Objectives
The attendee will be able to:
1. Articulate the historical and theoretical foundations of group psychotherapy practice.
2. Define major therapeutic factors in group treatment and understand how they contribute to the therapeutic process of the group.
3. Articulate the factors to consider in patient selection and group composition.

Course References:
1. American Group Psychotherapy Association Inc. (2007). Practice guidelines for group psychotherapy. New York. www.agpa.org/guidelines/index.html.
2. Gans, J., & Counselman, E.F. (2010). Patient Selection for Psychodynamic Group Psychotherapy: Practical and dynamic considerations. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy. 60(2), 197-220.
3. Mangione, L., & Nelson, D. (2003). The 1996 Mount Everest tragedy: Contemplation on group process and group dynamics. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 53(3), 353-373.
4. Rutan, J., Stone, W.N., & Shay, J. (2007). History of Small Group Theory and Practice. Psychodynamic Group Psychotherapy (4th Ed.). New York: The Guilford Press.
5. Weber, R. (2006). Principles of Group Psychotherapy. New York: American Group Psychotherapy Association Inc.
6. Weber, R., & Gans, J. (2003). The group therapist’s shame: A much undiscussed topic. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 53(4), 395-416.
7. Yalom, I., & Leszcz, M. (2005). The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy. New York: Basic Books.

Week 2–Sunday, January 22, Karen Travis, MSW, LCSW, CGP, FAGPA, Adjunct Faculty, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana and Course Director, Diane Montgomery-Logan, MA, CGP, Private Practice, Winooski, Vermont

The focus will be on small group dynamics and factors that lead to success in a psychotherapy group; various aspects of resistance and its significance to therapeutic progress in group; the impact of diversity on the process, dynamics and leadership of the group; and at least two models for group developmental stages.

Learning Objectives
The attendee will be able to:
1. Discuss the nature of multi-level group dynamics.
2. Describe how group dynamics are impacted by the structure, size, therapeutic factors and stages of group development.
3. Articulate the therapeutic uses of the group dynamics of resistance, transference and countertransference.
4. Identify the characteristics and usefulness of group-as-a-whole dynamics.
5. Describe the impact on group process, dynamics and leadership of culture, ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation.
6. Describe various models of stages of group development, including the group tasks and leadership responsibilities for each.

Course References:
1. American Group Psychotherapy Association Inc. (2007). Practice guidelines for group psychotherapy. New York. www.agpa.org/guidelines/index.html.
2. Billow, R. (2003). Bonding in group: The therapist’s contribution. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 53(1), 83-110.
3. Billow, R. (2006). The three r’s of group: Resistance, rebellion, and refusal. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 56(3), 259-284.
4. Debiak, D. (2007). Attending to diversity in group psychotherapy: An ethical imperative. 57(1), 1-12.
5. Rutan, J., Alonso, A., & Groves, J. (1998). Understanding defenses in group psychotherapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 38, 549-472.
6. Weber, R. (2006). Principles of Group Psychotherapy. New York: American Group Psychotherapy Association Inc.
7. Yalom, I., & Leszcz, M., (2005). The therapeutic factors. In The theory and practice of group psychotherapy. New York: Basic Books.

Week 3–Sunday, February 5, Eleanor Counselman, EdD, CGP, LFAGPA, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, Massachusetts and Course Director, Diane Montgomery-Logan, MA, CGP, Private Practice, Winooski, Vermont

The focus will be on the change process and the relationship of the focal points of change (affective, behavioral and cognitive) to group curative factors and mechanisms of change. We will explore a variety of models of change. We will address termination as an essential component of group psychotherapy.

Learning Objectives
The attendee will be able to:
1. Describe the therapeutic affective, behavioral and cognitive focal points of change.
2. Analyze the effect of the curative factors of group psychotherapy (from week 2) to affective, behavioral and cognitive change.
3. Articulate the role of imitation, identification, incorporation and internalization in producing change.
4. Compare the framework and process of two models of psychotherapeutic change: psychodynamic, psychodynamic as integral to group psychotherapy and interpersonal.
5. Describe the principles of termination as an essential facet of group psychotherapy.

Course References:
1. American Group Psychotherapy Association Inc. (2007). Practice guidelines for group psychotherapy. New York. www.agpa.org/guidelines/index.html.
2. Bernard, H. (1989). Guidelines to minimize premature terminations. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 39, 523-529.
3. Counselman, E.F. (2010). In consultation: Group therapy. Psychotherapy Networker, November/December.
4. Rutan, J.S., Stone, W.N., & Shay, J. (2007). Mechanisms and processes of change. In Psychodynamic Group Psychotherapy. New York: Guilford.
5. Weber, R. (2006). Principles of Group Psychotherapy. New York: American Group Psychotherapy Association Inc.
6. Yalom, I., & Leszcz, M., (2005). The therapeutic factors. In The theory and practice of group psychotherapy. New York: Basic Books.
7. Shapiro, E., & Ginzberg, R. (2003). Parting gifts: Termination rituals in group therapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 52 (3), 319-336.

Week 4–Sunday, February 19, Joshua Gross, PhD, CGP, ABPP, FAGPA, Group Psychotherapy Coordinator, The University Counseling Center at Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida and Course Director, Diane Montgomery-Logan, MA, CGP, Private Practice, Winooski, Vermont

The final teleconference of the four-week series will focus on the group leader, his/her qualities, roles, skills and tasks will be explored in relation to different models of group therapy. We will explore common ethical issues that arise for the group therapist and introduce concepts of evidence-based group therapy.

Learning Objectives
The attendee will be able to:
1. List qualities and characteristics that are useful for and desirable in a group leader. Distinguish these qualities from stylistic aspects and features of group leadership.
2. Describe the basic functions of the group leader as boundary sweeper, gate keeper, contract manager, safety officer and business person.
3. Articulate the various roles and functions of the group leader in different models of group therapy.
4. Outline the tasks and common errors of the leader of a new group.
5. Name familiar ethical issues encountered by group therapists. Describe the use of the Ethical Guidelines of AGPA, NRCGP and relevant professional disciplines as resources for navigating ethical issues.

Course References:
1. American Group Psychotherapy Association Inc. (2007). Practice guidelines for group psychotherapy. New York. www.agpa.org/guidelines/index.html.
2. Brabender, V. (2006). The ethical group psychotherapist. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 56(4), 395-414.
3. Brabender, V. (2007). The ethical group psychotherapist: A coda. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 57(1), 41-48.
4. Dreikurs, R. (1951). The unique social climate experienced in group psychotherapy. Group Therapy 3:292-299. Reprinted in MacKenzie, R. (1992) Classics in group psychotherapy. New York: The Guilford Press.
5. Drum, D.J., & Knott, E. (2009). Theme groups at thirty. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 59(4), 491-510.
6. Rutan, J., Stone, W.N., & Shay, J. (2007). The role of the group therapist. In J. Rutan & W. Stone (Eds.) Psychodynamic group psychotherapy (4th Ed.). New York: The Guilford Press.
7. Weber, R. (2006). Principles of Group Psychotherapy. New York: American Group Psychotherapy Association Inc.
8. Yalom, I., & Leszcz, M. (2005). The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy. New York: Basic Books.
These teleconferences will last for 90 minutes each (360 minutes total) and offer a total of six (6.0) Continuing Education credits.

In order to receive the full six credits, you must register and attend all four teleconferences. CE credits for AGPA Members are available at $90.00 for all four weeks; CE credits for Nonmembers are available at $180.00 for all four weeks. Payment includes the 90-minute teleconferences, access to the online test and upon successful completion a CE certificate. Registration for these teleconferences also assumes attendance for Part 2 at the AGPA 2012 Annual Meeting.

In order to participate, you must register at the AGPA Online CE Center. You will be emailed all of the necessary information to join in on the call as well as the presentation materials. Depending upon your personal phone service, long-distance charges might apply.