Category Archives: being Resilient

What are the top New Year’s resolutions for ‎2011? Should you consider them and find yours? While the order of the top New Year’s resolutions changes from year to year, and from source to source, these are some common evergreens as highlighted by About.com:

1. Spend More Time with Family & Friends
2. Fit in Fitness
3. Lose weight
4. Quit Smoking
5. Enjoy Life More
6. Quit Drinking
7. Get Out of Debt
8. Learn Something New
9. Help Others
10. Get Organized

What are our New Year’s resolutions ‎2011 tips? We’ll provide them the AmAreWay :-) AmAre in Italian, means “to love”; in English, interconnectedness: (I)Am (we) are. As a framework for success, transition, and happiness, AmAre stands for being:

* A – Aware and Accepting
* M – Meaningful and Motivated
* A – Active and Attentive
* R – Resilient and Respectful
* E – Eating properly and Exercising

We become Aware of current conditions, resources, strengths, goals: what is our priority for 2011? Changing one aspect involves changing its components as well, however we need to keep focus: we cannot change/do everything at once. Once we are more aware, we decide to be Accepting and appreciate the qualities which are already there. We all have rich qualities!

We see what is Meaningful for us, instead of making a resolution just because it seems everyone else is. We become Motivated to implement it, here and now.

We are Active in cultivating our resolution, and Attentive about results and feedback from action.

We Resilient in face of difficulties, or simply when things take longer than expected to be achieved. Remember, the first month is very important when it comes to implement resolutions, so let’s make sure each day contributes to our committment. And we are a;sp Respectful, because we are aware other people have their own goals and resolutions as well.

We consider Eating properly and Exercising to support our course of action. Proper food and regular exercise re-energize
our mind and body.

And, above all, happy new year!

frank

I tend to rabbit on and on about psychological flexibility. Why?

Because of all the psychological phenomena that I have studied, this is the one that is of by far the most help to the people I work with. Becoming more psychologically flexible helps people not just cope with stress but to do more of what it is they really value. So what exactly is it?

Psychological flexibility is “the ability to contact the present moment more fully as a conscious human being and to change, or persist in, behavior when doing so serves valued ends” (Biglan, Hayes, & Pistorello, 2008).

‘Contacting the present more fully’ means willing to be present with difficult thoughts and emotions and to accept ourselves as we are, not as we think we should be. This is a critical difference, because research shows that trying to get rid of our difficult thoughts and emotions increases their frequency, strength and duration (Wegner, 1994).

It also helps to understand psychological flexibility’s opposite orientation—experiential avoidance (EA). EA is the tendency to avoid or control unpleasant thoughts and feelings, even when doing so creates problems for a person. For example, someone who has the thought that they “are stupid” may avoid situations (e.g., a classroom) that might embarrass them. However, this strategy has the effect of systematically narrowing one’s options in life.

It’s easy to see how EA can be a problem in career change, but empirical evidence also associates EA with anxiety, depression, substance abuse, poor work performance and chronic stress. Conversely, becoming more psychologically flexible allows people to cope with life more effectively and to derive wellbeing as a consequence of valued living.

Being psychologically flexible doesn’t make life easier or more pleasant. But it makes it more vital and values-directed. And that, incidentally, is what most of my clients want from their career change; a life worth living.


Rob Archer is a London-based management consultant and psychologist with 15 years board-level experience in both public and private sectors. Rob’s research is around the concept of ‘meaning’ in work. He blogs on http://bloomblogrob.blogspot.com/

A course in happiness: book

November 15, 2010

A course in happiness, meaning, motivation, and well-being: how to be happier, purpose-driven and flourish” is our new book which offers tools to assess one’s well-being, and approaches to live a happier, purpose-driven and flourishing life. It will be released in early December, right in time to facilitate awareness, motivation and action with your new year resolutions :-)

A course in happiness, meaning, motivation, and well-being: how to be happier, purpose-driven and flourish – Book release

A course in happiness, meaning, motivation, and well-being” is different from other well-being books, because it offers a framework which is, at the same time, coherent enough to be easily remembered and implemented, and also flexible enough to be applied in different context and aspects of life. Click here to read the full story, see the book’s index, etc.